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CLOSE THIS BOOKOutreach N 66 - Drugs - Part 3: Herbal Medicine (OUTREACH - UNEP - WWF, 40 p.)
VIEW THE DOCUMENT(introduction...)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTArticles on herbal medicines that have appeared in back issues of OUTREACH
VIEW THE DOCUMENTContents
VIEW THE DOCUMENTPlants that kill can often cure (plus exercise)
VIEW THE DOCUMENTThe effect of plant chemicals on animals
VIEW THE DOCUMENTA disappearing storehouse of medicinal plants
VIEW THE DOCUMENTThe effect of plant chemicals on humans
VIEW THE DOCUMENTWar on drugs: the tobacco connection
VIEW THE DOCUMENTTraditional herbal medicine and “modern” medicine
VIEW THE DOCUMENTUsing local plants to treat intestinal worms
VIEW THE DOCUMENTTreating cuts and wounds
VIEW THE DOCUMENTUnderstanding medicinal plants teaching materials available from World Neighbors
VIEW THE DOCUMENTTraditional medicine to graduate
VIEW THE DOCUMENTFilm: Jungle pharmacy
VIEW THE DOCUMENTIndigenous treatment for drug dependence in Thailand
VIEW THE DOCUMENTIdentifying health-protecting customs
VIEW THE DOCUMENTA simple and effective cough syrup we can prepare at little cost from the plants we find around us
VIEW THE DOCUMENTDiscovering the uses of medicinal plants in your neighbourhood
VIEW THE DOCUMENTFilm and teaching suggestions - Herbal medicine: fact or fiction?
VIEW THE DOCUMENTPills and potions
VIEW THE DOCUMENTRevival of traditional medicine in Amazonia
VIEW THE DOCUMENTDecode the drug
VIEW THE DOCUMENTBiodiversity and health
VIEW THE DOCUMENTBarefoot doctors
VIEW THE DOCUMENTHow a rainforest in Western Samoa was saved

Treating cuts and wounds

Many of us cut ourselves by accident. With most accidents, there is not much bleeding. To treat cuts which are not very serious, follow these easy directions:

1. Stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure on the wound with a clean cloth or dressing.

2. Wash the wound with clean, boiled water in order to prevent infection.

3. Wrap the wound with a clean dressing or bandage, but do not wrap too tightly. If the dressing should become dirty, replace it with a clean one after washing the wound with boiled water again.

4. Again, do not put dirt or soil on a cut. Soil carries germs.

5. If the wound becomes infected, seek the help of your clinic or doctor.

Source: Pied Crew’s Environment Special Magazine Health issue 1: “First Aid”
Pied Crow, CARE/Kenya, P.O. Box 43864, Nairobi, KENYA

HOW A CACTUS CAN HELP STOP A WOUND FROM BLEEDING

Cactus juice can be used to clean wounds when there is no boiled water and no way to get any.

Cardon cactus also helps stop a wound from bleeding, because the juice makes the cut blood vessels squeeze shut.


Cardon Cactus (Pachycerius pectin-aboriginum)

1. Cut a piece of the cactus with a clean knife, and press it firmly against the wound.


Figure

2. When the bleeding is under control, tie a piece of the cactus to the wound with a strip of cloth.


Figure

3. After 2 or 3 hours, take off the cactus, and clean the wound with boiled water and soap.

Source: “Where There is No Doctor” by David Werner published by the Hesperian Foundation, 1977.
The Hesperian Foundation, P.O. Box 1692, Palo Alto, CA 94302, U.S.A.

USING GINGER TO TREAT A CUT


Ginger (Zingibre officinale)

1. Remove the skin from a piece of ginger, wash it and pat dry with a clean cloth.

2. With a clean grinding stone, grind the ginger together with a little sugar. (It has now been “scientifically” recognized that sugar helps healing.)

3. Put this paste on the cut, and bandage with a clean cloth. Take care that water does not touch the wound.

Source: “Home Remedies: Health Care at the Doorstep” World Neighbors in Action No. 18
World Neighbors, 5116 North Portland Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112, U.S.A.

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